how does a .jpg feel against your skin?

 

how does a .jpg feel against your skin?
Sophia Oppel and Blair Swann

Opening Reception: August 24th 2018: 7:00pm – 10:00pm
Exhibition Dates: August 24th – August 30st 2018

 

how does a .jpg feel against your skin? is a collaborative project by Sophia Oppel and Blair Swann that explores the relationship between text and image, specifically referencing the way image economies exist as a framing mechanism for bodies online. Using a co-written text as a conceptual reference point, from which portions were fed into various search engines, how does a .jpg feel against your skin? re-interprets the resulting images from their original linguistic terms, exploring their lateral relationships to one another. In warping, overlaying, and rendering physical these images, Oppel and Swann’s project mediates colonial notions of linear perspective and the humanist legacies that under pin image culture online.

 

About the Artists:
Sophia Oppel is an arts practitioner based in Toronto, Ontario. Oppel’s work addresses the position of insidious, hegemonic power embedded in networked existence and its manifestations in embodied experience. Oppel’s practice is based in digital media and interactive installations; employing algorithms, web applications, software pre-sets and the viewer’s body as subject matter, she attempts to deconstruct the implicit assumptions imposed upon users. Oppel has exhibited throughout Ontario, including shows at Bunker 2 Contemporary Art Container, Forest City Gallery, and XPACE Cultural Centre, and is an alumni of Roundtable Residency.

 

Blair Swann is a Toronto-based Canadian artist who explores topics of narrative, identity, landscape, and perception, often through physically altering images. His work has appeared in solo and group exhibitions in Toronto and internationally. Swann has also organized publications, residencies, and exhibitions, including curatorial projects at XPACE Cultural Centre and The Door, a public art space. He has contributed writing to Long Winter, Avalanche! Institute of Contemporary Art, the Hart House Review, and InterAccess.